Reuben Taureka Highway?

08 NOVEMBER 2020

NOTICE

GREGORY BABLIS

In this picture of the First Ministry, Taureka is the Papuan man who is standing third from left and to the right of Sir J.

A few years ago the PNG Government decided to rename the well-known Magi Highway after Sir Dr Reuben Taureka. Understandably, the people of Central had mixed reactions and some were anxious and angry about the name change. There was even an alternative suggestion to name the highway Polonsky Highway after one “Taubada Joe” who was well-known to the locals in the 1970s. This is all well and good but why name the highway after a foreigner? No matter how beloved he may have been let us try to remember our historical Papua New Guinean figures and honour them too before honouring foreigners.

Sir Dr Reuben Taureka is indeed a worthy person to be venerated. He was the son of a Papuan pastor (Pacific Islands Monthly 1 January 1961). He graduated from Suva Medical College in 1952 and at the age of 38 was appointed Acting Assistant Director of Medical Services for Papua and New Guinea in 1966. At that time, it was the highest position ever held by a Papuan or New Guinean in the Territory Public Service. When announcing his appointment, Director of the Department of Public Health, Dr R. F. R. Scragg said that Dr Taureka would undergo extensive training in his new position. “This will fit him for senior permanent positions such as regional medical officer or assistant director”, Dr Scragg said. (Canberra Times, 1966)

In 1961, Taureka was the President of the first Papuan Workers’ Association and he was the first “official” indigenous member of the Legislative Council of Papua and New Guinea (Pacific Islands Monthly 1 January 1961). The first indigenous members of the Legislative Council – Simogun, Salin and Dickson – who were appointed by Sir Paul Hasluck in 1951 were “unofficial” members.

When Chief Minister Somare formed PNGs first Ministry in 1975, Taureka was appointed as PNGs first Papua New Guinean Minister for Health.

Sir Reuben Taureka sadly passed away on 11 December 2017.

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If you have any information about Sir Dr Reuben Taureka please share and let’s collectively write his story.

Voices from the War: Stories from Milne Bay

08 NOVEMBER 2020

CATHERINE NOLAN (Editor)

NOTICE

This short book comprises some of the experiences and encounters that the people of Milne Bay Province had during the time when World War Two came to Papua New Guinea. The men and women whose stories are included in the book took part in a study during March and April of 2017. They were interviewed by a small team comprising Dr Anne-Dickson Waiko, Mr Keimolo Gima and Ms Elizabeth Taulehebo of the University of Papua New Guinea.

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2019

Nolan, Catherine (Editor)

Papua New Guinea-Australia Partnership Produced by Deakin University Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Licence

PNG National Museum & Art Gallery – PNGAus Partnership Download free here http://dro.deakin.edu.au/pdfjs/web/viewer.html?file=http://dro.deakin.edu.au/eserv/DU:30122370/nolan-voicesfromthewar-2019.pdf#page=2 (4.42 MB) or visit the Voices from the War website here http://pngvoices.deakin.edu.au/resources to learn more and see other related resources. If you’re in Port Moresby, inquire at the National Museum & Art Gallery or the Australian High Commission for free hard copies.You can also listen to audio recordings of these interviews online here http://pngvoices.deakin.edu.au/ or visit the Be Jijimo Gallery (Oral History Gallery, National Museum & Art Gallery) and listen to the audio recordings on the headset and gallery touchscreens.

Voices from the War: Stories from New Ireland

08 NOVEMBER 2020

NOTICE

Nolan, Catherine (Editor)

This short book comprises some of the experiences and encounters that the people of New Ireland had during the time when World War Two came to Papua New Guinea. The men and women whose stories are included in the book took part in a study from March to May of 2017. They were interviewed by a small team comprising Dr Lalen Simeon of Pacific Adventist University in PNG and Dr Jonathan Ritchie and Ms Catherine Nolan of Deakin University in Australia. They were assisted by Mr Richard Talevu from New Ireland.

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Papua New Guinea-Australia Partnership

Produced by Deakin University Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Licence

PNG National Museum & Art Gallery – PNGAus Partnership Download free here http://dro.deakin.edu.au/pdfjs/web/viewer.html?file=http://dro.deakin.edu.au/eserv/DU:30122371/nolan-voicesfromthewarireland-2019.pdf#page=2 (8.14 MB) or visit the Voices from the War website here http://pngvoices.deakin.edu.au/resources to learn more and see other related resources. If you’re in Port Moresby, inquire at the National Museum & Art Gallery or the Australian High Commission for free hard copies. You can also listen to audio recordings of these interviews online here http://pngvoices.deakin.edu.au/ or visit the Be Jijimo Gallery (Oral History Gallery, National Museum & Art Gallery) and listen to the audio recordings on the headset and gallery touchscreens.

Aisoli Salin of New Ireland: Memories of a Great Teacher

08 NOVEMBER 2020

Notice

Compiled by Jonathan Ritchie from conversations with Aisoli Salins’ family and pupils, 2019

This book tells the story of one of Papua New Guinea’s first leaders, Aisoli Salin from New Ireland. It has been written from the memories of late Aisoli Salin’s family members, living on the islands of Tatau and Simberi in New Ireland Province and in Kavieng as well.

Aisoli Salin was a teacher, journalist and one of PNG’s first three native members of the Legislative Council of Papua-New Guinea in 1951.

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Biographical

Papua New Guinea-Australia Partnership Produced by Deakin University Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial LicencePNG National Museum & Art Gallery – PNGAus Partnership Download free here http://dro.deakin.edu.au/pdfjs/web/viewer.html?file=http://dro.deakin.edu.au/eserv/DU:30122369/ritchie-aisolisalin-2019.pdf (5.16 MB) or visit the Voices from the War website here http://pngvoices.deakin.edu.au/resources to learn more and see other related resources.

If you’re in Port Moresby, inquire at the National Museum & Art Gallery or the Australian High Commission for free hard copies. You can also visit the Haus Independens Gallery (Old House of Assembly, MacGregor St, Downtown, Port Moresby) to learn more about Aisoli Salin and the formative years of PNG in which he lived and worked.

Interesting Books Written by Papua New Guineans You Should Read

08 NOVEMBER 2020

SKERAH

We need a generation of “bookfacers” more than “facebookers”!

It’s important that we create and embed in our children the importance of reading and writing.  Creating a culture isn’t an easy task but requires persistence.  And it is indeed a challenging task given the competitive nature and evolving technology we are “faced” with every day.  But there is a lot of inspiration to draw from our own kind and during the course of this year, we will be listing some of the books written by talented Papua New Guinea writers for you or your child’s reading entertainment.  Some of the books can be purchased online.

Over the Christmas break, we had a chance to contact several of our readers on what books written by Papua New Guineans they recommended as a “good read”.

Here’s the first five to start off.

  1. The Crocodile by Vincent Eri

This is a book written by former Governor General the late Sir Vincent Eri. Sir Vincent is often cited as the first Papua New Guinean to have ever published a book in English. The novel is about a man who must avenge himself on the sorcerers who have caused his wife to be eaten by a crocodile. He must also come to terms with colonial rule, with himself and with the crocodile.  It’s an interesting book that includes traditional myths, legends, and tales of magic to express the life of a village where the sacred and secular coexist.

  1. My Mother Calls Me Yaltep by Sir Ignatius Kilage

Another former Governor General, this book was published in the 1980’s.  According to a prominent Papua New Guinean short story writer and teacher, Dr Steven Winduo, My Mother Calls Me Yaltep “remains a classic PNG semi-autobiography”.

  1. Ten Thousand Years in a Lifetime by Maori Kiki

Written by the late Sir Maori Kiki, this is a story of local jungle boy his life and how he grew up to become one of its prominent leaders before the country’s independence from Australia.

  1. Nanu Sina My Words by Carolyn Evari

Unlike the previous three books, Carolyn Evari’s “Nanu Sina My Words” is a collection of poetry. In an interview with Betty Wakia, Evari stated that the book was divided into four parts.  – Conflicts, Relationships, Hope and Family. In each, “you will find poems that resonate with the theme. For example, under Conflict, you find poems that talk about war, doubt and fear and under Relationships there are poems about love and friendship.

  1. My Walk to Equality edited by Rashmii Amoah Bell

This book is a collection of essays, stories and poetry by Papua New Guinea women.  The anthology celebrates the contribution of women to Papua New Guinean society. Papua New Guinean women are doctors and nurses, business leaders, environmental activists, and politicians. Other women in more traditional roles form the backbone of Papua New Guinean society.  Susan Francis in her review of this book last year said “First let me say this is an extraordinary book. I learnt so much. Sometimes I was confronted, most dreadfully, by choices demanded of the individuals depicted, and at other times my heart swelled with hope.”

Tell us your favorite book written by a Papua New Guinean.

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Original post can be found at https://skerah.com/lifestyle/books/top-books-written-by-papua-new-guineans-you-should-read/.

Let’s Write Books! – A Letter from His Excellency

08 NOVEMBER 2020

SIR PAULIAS MATANE

In 1957 I started my career as a primary school teacher at Tauran Primary School in New Britain where I was a student from 1947 to 1955. I found that we did not have many books about Papua New Guinea. The few reading books were written by expatriates.

When I became headmaster of the same school the next year, it dawned on me that unless we wrote books about our own country, we would continue to become slaves on our own land. I wanted to write books but I found it difficult because there was no one to help me. In 1964, when I became a school inspector in Minj Sub-district of Western Highlands, the then manager of Oxford University Press in Melbourne visited me. To my surprise, he asked me to write a book about anything and send the manuscript to him. I decided to spend weekends in nearby villages, talk with the people about their ways of life and work with them in their gardens, on their houses and pig fences. I learned so much I wrote something which I sent to Melbourne. Not too long after, I received a letter from the publisher informing me that they would publish my first book titled Kum Tumun of Minj. When I received the first copy I was so happy that I danced around the room, beat my chest and sang aloud.

Not long after, I received a request from Oxford University Press, London, to write a book about my early life in my village of New Britain. I wasted no time to write the book My Childhood in New Guinea. It was accepted and published in 1972. This book has been reprinted so many times. It has also been translated into Japanese.

The publication of these two first books encouraged me to write more books. Up to now I have written and published forty-two (42) books. I am now working on my 43rd book titled Education for Life.

I have used my gained experiences to help other Papua New Guineans to write their own books. So far, 28 Papua New Guinean writers have had their books published with my help – not only here but also overseas. Five have had their second books published. This shows me one thing: We are just as good as anyone else in the world to write books if we are committed to putting our thoughts and experiences together on paper.

Because of the experiences some of us have gained in writing and having our books published, we urge all Papua New Guineans to write. There are many things to write about like cultures, history of families, clans and so on. Books can be factual or novels. There are many genres Papua New Guineans can write in.  

Some of my books described in this catalogue are not only about Papua New Guinea but about other parts of the world. I urge you to order copies from “Paulias Matane Foundation Inc.” Address and prices are at the back of the catalogue.

Here is the link to the catalogue http://www.gullonline.org/…/Books_by_Sir_Paulias_Matane…

Books by Sir Paulias Matane

08 NOVEMBER 2020

GREGORY BABLIS

NOTICE

The eighth Governor-General of Papua New Guinea, Sir Paulias Matane is a prolific writer. He has written over 40 books throughout his long career. He holds the unique honour of being the only Papua New Guinean to have travelled to all seven continents in the world. His travels all over the globe have also been the subjects of some of his books.

Check the link below for an impressive list of his books and their prices available through the Paulias Matane Foundation Inc. These are great educational books deliberately written in simple English. If you want to order copies, please make cheques payable to: ‘PAULIAS MATANE FOUNDATION INC’ and send to PO Box 79, Port Moresby, NCD, Papua New Guinea. Proceeds from the sales of these books will NOT benefit Sir Paulias Matane personally and financially as the author but will go towards charity. Sir Paulias Matane has been donating to charity, privately, for over two decades. Email jwaingut@datec.net.pg for more information.

http://www.gullonline.org/…/Books_by_Sir_Paulias_Matane… (762 KB).

Covid-19 und die ‚neue Normalität‘

07 NOVEMBER 2020

MICHAEL DOM

The Covid-19 ‘new normal’
© Michael Dom

Die globale Covid-19-Pandemie hat viele Auswirkungen auf das tägliche Leben. Die Regierung von Papua-Neuguinea (PNG) hält sich an die Empfehlungen der Weltgesundheitsorganisation und definiert die ‚neue Normalität‘ für ihre Bürgerinnen und Bürger.

Doch für Tausende von peri-urbanen Armen, die in wirtschaftlich schwierigen Zeiten ums Überleben kämpfen, sind die Folgen von Gesundheitsmaßnahmen ganz normal.

In Nine Mile am Okuk Highway außerhalb von Lae City, dem Wirtschaftszentrum von PNG, wird am Straßenrand, meist von Müttern, Gemüse verkauft – mit nur einem Meter Abstand zum fließenden Verkehr.

Die Märkte am Highway sind seit Mitte Mai diesen Jahres in vollem Gange, noch bevor der erste offizielle Lockdown im Land am 2. Juni endete. Sie sind überlebenswichtig für Haushalte mit Jahreseinkommen unter 2.000 Euro.

Der Nine Mile Markt ist einer von mehreren beliebten Märkten für frisches Gemüse – alle informell entlang des Highways, der aus Lae herausführt. Er ist nachmittags an sieben Tagen die Woche offen. Während des Lockdowns von April bis Juni wurde er offiziell geschlossen, als ein ausländischer Arbeiter in einem Hotel in Ten Mile an dem Virus erkrankte.

Normalerweise fand der Markt auf einer Fläche gegenüber der Fahrbahn statt, wo er jetzt ist. Lokale Landbesitzer, die Community und ein in der Nähe ansässiges Geflügelunternehmen hatten das bei ständigen Streitigkeiten so ausgehandelt.

Der Marktplatz selbst ist ein kahles Stück Land, auf dem frisches Gemüse auf zerschnittenen Plastikplanen oder Matten liegt. Schatten spenden große Schirme oder Verschläge mit Tüchern.

Informelle Märkte schaffen für mehr als die Hälfte der Bevölkerung die wirtschaftlich wichtigste Erwerbstätigkeit. Schätzungen zufolge sind nur etwa 15% der 8 Millionen Einwohnerinnen und Einwohner des Landes formell beschäftigt.

Informelle Gemüsemärkte werden von den lokalen Regierungen jedoch kaum beachtet. Selbst die grundlegendsten Dinge fehlen, wie sanitäre Einrichtungen – also etwas so Simples wie die Möglichkeit, sich die Hände zu waschen, geschweige denn eine Toilette.

Informelle Märkte wie Nine Mile werden normalerweise dort eingerichtet, wo es Gewohnheitsrechte gibt, aber ohne Verpflichtungen gegenüber lokalen Regierungen.

Es ist klar, dass sich die lokale Spitze auch nicht zu kommunalen Gesundheitsdiensten verpflichtet sieht.

Das Beste, auf das die Frauen vom Nine Mile Markt hoffen können: dass die Polizei nicht auftaucht, um sie zu vertreiben und ihre Produkte kaputtzumachen. So erging es Frauen in einer ähnlichen Lage in der Hauptstadt Port Moresby.

Diese Normalität ist nicht neu.

Übersetzung: Iris Thalhammer

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Michael Dom

The Covid-19 ‘new normal’

Michael Theophilus Dom, born in 1977, is a poet and scientist, graduated from University of Adelaide (PhD in animal science) and University of Papua New Guinea (BSc in chemistry), and working at the Papua New Guinea National Agriculture Research Institute. Dom is doing science & technology research for developing Papua New Guinea’s smallholder agriculture and livestock sector. In 2012, Dom won the Poetry Award of PNG’s national literary competition, The Crocodile Prize, for his sonnet “I met a pig farmer the other day”. His first collection of poetry, “At another Crossroads”, was published by the UPNG Press in 2013. Michael’s second collection, “The Musing of an Assistant Pig Keeper”, and two chapbooks, “O Arise!” and “Send words as gifts”, were published on the CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform in 2015 and 2016 respectively. His most recent publications are “Dried grass over rough-cut logs” and “26 sonnets”, by PNG independent publishers late Francis Nii and Jordan Dean, respectively.

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This article first appeared on 31.08.2020 in the LCB Diplomatique – The Literary Colloquium Berlin’s alternative news portal International literary correspondents report on political aspects of their everyday lives in texts and images at https://lcb.de/diplomatique/the-covid-19-new-normal/?en.

Covid-19 ‘noho dala matamatana’

07 NOVEMBER 2020

MICHAEL DOM

The Covid-19 ‘new normal’
© Michael Dom

Tanobada egegemada lalonai e varamu gorerena Covid-19 metauna na, ta noho laidiamu mauridia lalodiai vada ta dibadiamu, Bona World Health Organization edia taravatu eiava ede baita mauri toma daladia, e ato lasi, bena Papua New Guinea gavamani ese danu ‘noho dala matamatana’ ealasi ena taunimanima edia.

To settlement ai e nohomu taunimanima dia na ini ededegwamu ina economic crisis lalodia, edia health taravatu dia e ato dio na vada dia gauta.

Lae City na PNG ena trade bona industry gabuna, Lae amo e lasimu dala badana na Okuk Highway bena unuseni ai gabuta na Nine Mile. Bena ini dala badinai e maketimu, hutuma na hahine. Idia na dala esenai mo e helaimu, motuka oromadia danu se lalomu.

May, lagani uanai, edia maketi na e lao goevagoeva. Lockdown ginigunana e hekara, to idia na do unu e maketiva ela bona June 2 ai lockdown taravatu na e atoa siri. Kara ini etomadia e varamu na mauri elaoreana.

Ia danu maketi ta, badina kabedi bona ini gau iboudiai na adorai iboudiai uma amo e lasi laidiamu bena e maketi diamu. To April ela June na taravatu taudia ese e koua, badina tau-kurokuro ta na 10 Mile ai e gorerea.

Guna e maketiva gabuna na e raka tania badina tano taudia bona kokoroku bisinisi tauna ta ida dispute anaianai e abimu.

Umbrella badadia eiava kalaga-kalaga enudiai edia maketi gaudia puse latadiai e atomu

PNG ena population na 8 million, 15% taunimanima dia mo e gaukaramu. A ini taunimanima iboudiai na lasi, unadainai idia bona davadia dia bada ediai black maketi na gau badana.

Local Level Government ese ini taunimanima na e itadia guilagimu eiava se duaidiamu, hegeregeredia, mei-ruma eiava ranu paipu dai danu edia se atomu.

Hanaihanai dala badidia hanuadia na mai maketi dia, egeregerena Nine Mile maketina. Tano lohiadia ida e hereve-hereve gunamu gabeamo edia maketi e karadiamu, tano lohiadia bona local government na se gaukara eboumu.

Tano lohiadia edia laloadai danu unuetomana. Ede baetomu danu lewadia, community health services ediai danu asi gauta.

Nine Mile ai e maketimu hahine dia edia lalo hekwarai tamona na polisi ese basie luludia oho bena edia maketi gaudia bae hadikadia, egeregerena Port Moresby City hahine dia ediai e vara.

Ini gau na dia matamta.

(Gemona Konemamata ese Motu gadoai etorea)

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Michael Dom

Michael Theophilus Dom, born in 1977, is a poet and scientist, graduated from University of Adelaide (PhD in animal

The Covid-19 ‘new normal’

science) and University of Papua New Guinea (BSc in chemistry), and working at the Papua New Guinea National Agriculture Research Institute. Dom is doing science & technology research for developing Papua New Guinea’s smallholder agriculture and livestock sector. In 2012, Dom won the Poetry Award of PNG’s national literary competition, The Crocodile Prize, for his sonnet “I met a pig farmer the other day”. His first collection of poetry, “At another Crossroads”, was published by the UPNG Press in 2013. Michael’s second collection, “The Musing of an Assistant Pig Keeper”, and two chapbooks, “O Arise!” and “Send words as gifts”, were published on the CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform in 2015 and 2016 respectively. His most recent publications are “Dried grass over rough-cut logs” and “26 sonnets”, by PNG independent publishers late Francis Nii and Jordan Dean, respectively.

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This article first appeared on 31.08.2020 in the LCB Diplomatique – The Literary Colloquium Berlin’s alternative news portal International literary correspondents report on political aspects of their everyday lives in texts and images at https://lcb.de/diplomatique/the-covid-19-new-normal/?en.

The Covid-19 ‘new normal’

07 NOVEMBER 2020

MICHAEL DOM

The Covid-19 ‘new normal’
© Michael Dom

The global pandemic of Covid-19 has had many repercussions to daily life and keeping abreast with World Health Organization recommendations, the Papua New Guinea (PNG) government has also defined the ‘new normal’ for its citizens.

But to thousands of the peri-urban poor, struggling to survive during trying economic times, the impact of policing health measures is just another normal day.

At Nine Mile on the Okuk Highway outside of Lae City, PNG’s economic hub, market vendors, mostly mothers, have set up their vegetable selling activities along the side of the road, seated one meter away from moving traffic.

The highway-side markets have been going strong since the middle of May this year, even before the first official nationwide lockdown ended on June 2. It’s a basic survival need for households with annual incomes less than 2,000 Euro.

Nine Mile market is one of a number of popular fresh vegetable markets set up on an informal basis along the highway leading out of Lae. It operates in the afternoons seven days a week but was officially closed during the April to June enforced Covid-19 lock-down, when an expatriate worker fell ill to the viral infection in a hotel at Ten Mile.

The usual location for the market was an area opposite the current lane, an area negotiated with regular disputation, between local land owners, the community and a poultry company based nearby.

The market place itself is a bare patch of land where fresh vegetables are placed on cut plastic sheets or mats and shade may be provided by large umbrellas or lean-to draped with shading cloth.

Informal marketing is the most important economic earning activity for more than half of the population while it is estimated that only about 15% of the country’s 8 million people have formal means of employment.

Yet informal vegetable markets are given scant attention by local level governments for even the most basic services, such as sanitation as simple as a source of clean water to wash hands, let alone a latrine.

Informal market places, such as Nine Mile market are usually set within communities where land use is negotiated with customary land owners who have no obligation to local governments.

It is apparent that local leaders also have no obligations towards community health services.

The best the women marketers at Nine Mile can hope for is that the police won’t turn up to run them off and destroy their produce, as was done to women in a similar predicament in the capital city Port Moresby.

This normal is not new.

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Michael Dom

Michael Theophilus Dom, born in 1977, is a poet and scientist, graduated from University of Adelaide (PhD in animal

The Covid-19 ‘new normal’

science) and University of Papua New Guinea (BSc in chemistry), and working at the Papua New Guinea National Agriculture Research Institute. Dom is doing science & technology research for developing Papua New Guinea’s smallholder agriculture and livestock sector. In 2012, Dom won the Poetry Award of PNG’s national literary competition, The Crocodile Prize, for his sonnet “I met a pig farmer the other day”. His first collection of poetry, “At another Crossroads”, was published by the UPNG Press in 2013. Michael’s second collection, “The Musing of an Assistant Pig Keeper”, and two chapbooks, “O Arise!” and “Send words as gifts”, were published on the CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform in 2015 and 2016 respectively. His most recent publications are “Dried grass over rough-cut logs” and “26 sonnets”, by PNG independent publishers late Francis Nii and Jordan Dean, respectively.

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This article first appeared on 31.08.2020 in the LCB Diplomatique – The Literary Colloquium Berlin’s alternative news portal International literary correspondents report on political aspects of their everyday lives in texts and images at https://lcb.de/diplomatique/the-covid-19-new-normal/?en.